April

news & updates

———————-
4/21 Issue 5
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Upcoming Events

April 2021 Winter Lecture Promo
The 2021 Online Winter Lecture Series:
In Their Own Words
————
Friday, April 30, 2021, 7:00pm
Turn-of-the Century Tales: from “Wainscott Dumplings” by Alice E. Osborn Hand (1879-1968)
Speaker: Hilary Osborn-Malecki
————
Contact Marianne for more information.
Marine Life Origami
Join Marianne for a lesson in marine life origami!
————
————
Curious about those antiques in your house that you inherited or purchased? Want to know more about their age, design history, and construction?
————
Join the Society on Thursday, May 6th at 7pm via zoom as Chief Curator, Richard Barons, will answer your burning questions about your heirlooms. This month, we will be focusing on chairs.
————
Send in a photograph of your chair, as well as any questions you may have about it, to Marianne Della Croce at info@easthamptonhistory.org by Thursday, April 8th. Five will be selected for the discussion.
————
All submissions will be anonymous. The discussion is free and open to anyone. Please note – we are not able to provide you with an appraisal of your furniture.
————
Photo: Comb back, bird cage, Windsor rocking chair, painted black, c. 1810. From the collection of the East Hampton Historical Society.
————
Thursday, May 6, 2021
7:00 PM

Work Begins at Clinton Academy

————
100 years ago, the Society had its first meeting at Clinton Academy.
————
Today, work begins on the roof, porch, columns, and chimney to bring Clinton and the Town House back to their former glory!
————
Due to a generous anonymous donation, the work is being overseen by Ben Krupinski Builder.
————
Keep checking our pages for updates and progress photos.
————
Pictured: Chimney work by Osurac Masonary.
————

Your Help is Needed!

————
The East Hampton Historical Society, like so many other non-profits, relies on public support to continue our mission of the preservation of the history and the culture of our community, and we need your help!
————
Please consider supporting the Society as we move into our centennial year of 2021 as YOUR historical society.
————
Your generous donation goes to preserving these important landmarks for future generations and ensuring we can continue to offer an exceptional calendar of events and programs.
————
Thank you in advance for your support!

Membership Matters

————
Museums are just as important to the future as the future is to museums. Not only can our museums bring history to life, but they can also shine a light on both our present and our future.
————
The East Hampton Historical Society has a responsibility and duty to provide a sense of community and place by celebrating a collective heritage, offering a great way to get to know the history of East Hampton, as well as inspiring the next generation to be stewards and caretakers of these wonderful buildings and artifacts.
————
As we head into 2021, we look toward transforming our museums from spaces of looking and learning to spaces of interaction, participation, and engagement. As the world evolves, so shall we with innovative programming and new ways to utilize technology to improve the visitor experience.
————
A great way to be a part of the excitement, is to join the Society as a member. Your membership helps us continue to tell the remarkable stories of East Hampton, and to ensure we will be standing for years to come – and entitles you to great benefits!
————
Join (rejoin) today!
————
————

The Fens Garden

by Frances Benjamin Johnson (1864-1952)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Spring into Action

There is no such thing as an instant gardener. The essence of a gardener is that of patience, persistence, and care. Anyone who toils in the dirt sees the potential in every seedling to become a glorious spectacle of nature.
————
Museum work is a lot like gardening, patience, persistence, and care. Patience in the time it takes to plan and see exhibits come to life, persistence in the planning of events and programs for positive outcomes, and care, about history, our offerings, and most importantly the public.
————
However, we are not in it alone. You are gardeners with us. Through your involvement, you help us to grow more sustainable. Following a difficult 2020, we remained dedicated to the public by sharing numerous online programs (Influential Women Series, Make it Mondays, Ask a Curator, and more) and safe events in person such as Votes for Women and Aglow.
————
Whether financial support through donations, museum visits, or event attendance, your involvement, helps us grow. We are planning safe events this 2021 season and great new online programming but could use your help to Spring into Action. How can you help?
————
Support us with a donation!
Participate in one of our online programs!
Renew your membership or Join!
Invite your friends to follow us on Instagram and Facebook for the latest!
Note on your calendar the 2021 in person events as they are announced! We hope to see you there!
Get your friends involved! Tell them about us and ask them to join our mailing list!
————
Consider sowing seeds by giving to our nonprofit.
————
We hope to see you at one of our events
or museums this summer!
————
Maria Vann
Executive Director
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Volunteer Spotlight 

Hugh King

————
Meet Hugh King, East Hampton’s unofficial town crier. Hugh volunteers with the Society, providing lectures, tours, field trips, and public programs. However, his interest in history began during his childhood.
————
Hugh grew up in Amagansett, and currently lives in his childhood home, which was built before 1913.
————
His father was from Amagansett, but his mother was from Brooklyn, and they met while she was visiting the east end. They married and moved to Brooklyn, and came back to Amagansett when Hugh was six years old. Hugh fondly remembers the simpler time of his childhood, such as catching for the local baseball team – which played in the lot across from his house. He loves the neighborhood Amagansett provided him, and he remembers his childhood was one that was truly special.
————
Hugh went to college for early education – he believed he could be a better Social Studies teacher than the one he had in high school, becoming an elementary school teacher in Riverhead for two years and then in Springs for over thirty years.
————
Hugh began working with the Society by teaching classes in the Townhouse. He then became a guide at Clinton Academy. He remembers setting up a desk outside the Academy to greet visitors, and in between guests, he would borrow records from the East Hampton Library and read through them. This began his involvement with our local history. He enjoys learning about the differences between the five different towns and understanding the unique stories behind each one.
————
Hugh enjoys this local research, saying the best part about it is being asked a question he does not know the answer to. He knows there are a lot of historical resources, and therefore numerous places, where he can find answers. Currently, he is working with our Chief Curator, Richard Barons, on a mystery behind a bell from the 1860s which was found in a Montauk barn. They are trying to discover if it came from a local shipwreck. He also enjoys it when visitors tell him facts or stories he himself did not know, an occurrence which just happened to him on the last cemetery tour he provided for the Society.
————
For fun, Hugh enjoys his baseball card collection from the 1950s, which he takes out of their cases every winter and reads the backs of them. He, his wife, Loretta, and his cat, The Little Prince, enjoy the peace of the natural beauty of Amagansett, during all of its various seasons.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Volunteer today!
————
Looking for a way to become more involved with the historical society this season? Consider becoming a volunteer! We have a wide variety of positions open, and there is something for everyone.
————
Visitor Center Volunteers:
Duties include greeting visitors, answering questions about and providing directions to the Society’s sites, and selling merchandise at the shop.  Training is required to learn how to use a point-of-sale system and to learn about our various sites.
————
Event Support:
Duties may include greeting visitors, taking tickets, handing out programs, providing support to staff as needed.
————
Collections:
Duties include assisting Chief Curator with research, scanning documents and photographs and labelling artifacts. Also assist with entering information into catalogue database, Past Perfect.
————
Contact Marianne for more information.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In Case You Missed the Latest Treasures
on Main Street, Gardiner Brown House
Treasures of Main Street, Gardiner Brown House
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Happy Spring…Happy Easter!
————
Mrs. J. Custis Lawrence’s redwork counterpane is loaded with Spring and summer flowers (pictured left). Phebe Alice Edwards was born in 1973 and she probably completed the spread before she married the Montauk born architect, J. Custis Lawrence.
————
Their first daughter, Mattie, was born in 1900. By the 1880s, pre-cut squires of white cotton were sold for a penny at dry goods store, so these pictorial pieced tops were often called penny quilts.
————
Turkey red thread was very popular with the young embroiders because it was colorfast, unlike most other colors of embroidery floss. This style of quilt became all the rage until 1930s. The vast range of pictures could come from pattern books, tracing from magazines, and even by using the new invention, carbon paper. So many of the pictures in Phebe’s counterpane are unusual, she many have drawn them herself. This adorable picture of little chicks (above) sailing down a stream in a top hat, seems to express both Easter and spring.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Seeking Volunteer Docents

————
Looking for a great way to meet new people and learn something new? The East Hampton Historical Society is seeking volunteer docents to interpret our historic sites to the visiting public. Duties include creating intellectual and emotional connections to the exhibits for our visitors by walking visitors through the exhibits, and creating positive learning experiences for the visitors, answering questions as needed.
————
Training will be provided to learn about the historic artifacts, exhibitions and historic content of the sites.
————
We are seeking docents for the East Hampton Marine Museum, which will be open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays 11am-3pm. If you’re able to volunteer for one shift, or for multiple shifts, we are interested in you!
————
If interested, please email Marianne Della Croce.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
East Hampton Lil’ Explorers
Family Drop-In Program for Summer Fun!
————
Drop over to Mulford farm for some “historic” adventures with the Society’s education team.
————
Each day will explore a different theme full of activities, games, and education. All supplies are included, and there is no charge for accompanying adult.
————
Monday – Young Writers: Ready to earn the Nobel Prize for Literature? Start here! On Monday, August 2nd, we will make our own journals and write a story using historic photos as our prompts. We will also be making our own invisible ink to write secret messages to our friends!
————
Tuesday – Forces of Nature: Unleash your outdoor curiosity! On Tuesday, August 3rd, we will explore a historic garden and have the chance to sow some seeds there! We will also take a nature walk, create a suncatcher from what we find, and learn about the ecosystem in our own backyard.
————
Wednesday – Games Galore: On Wednesday, August 4th, play games like East Hampton Kids of yore! Try your hand at rolling a hoop and making your own whirligig! Practice your hand at playing marbles and jacks too.
————
Thursday – Time Travelers: It’s not your parents’ summer program, but we will be doing activities like they did when they were kids waaaaaay back in the 1980s! On Thursday, August 5th, we will create your own magnetic tetris puzzle, design tubular 80s shades, and make individualized lanyards. Totally rad, dude!
————
Friday – Concoctions and Potions: End the week with our ice cream party! On Friday, August 6th, we will stir, shake and mix common household items for a sweet snack or two (contains dairy).  Stir up your own tornado in a quick science project too.
————
August 2-6, 2021
9:30am-12pm
$15 Future Members per day
$10 Members per day
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Curator’s Corner

——————————
Springtime often explodes with a burst of flowers as an overture for Easter, always in an abundance of fresh yellows. This huge Staffordshire platter reflects the enthusiasm that early 19th century customers had for displays of blossoms. Though in the Oriental taste for blue and white, the roses, bellflowers, periwinkles and a single poppy, are exuberantly overflowing out of their urn and hardly need extra colors. Dating from around 1825, this pottery serving plate is completely covered with flowers in panels and borders. The design is created by a transfer printing technique that replaced the need for skilled painter-decorators. Huge sets of this pattern could be made for less cost, therefore, making decorated ceramics affordable to a wilder public. This platter is surely large enough to hold an Easter baked ham.
————
William Efner Wheelock’s summer cottage “Bonack Acres,” one of the earliest Shingle Style cottages built here in 1891, still sits on an ancient dune, well back from Georgica Road. This architectural style was influenced by early New England farmhouses. To furnish Bonack Acres the Wheelocks collected antiques from the old Main Street families on Main Street. The 1880s was the beginning of the craze for collectecting American Antiques. The Wheelocks lived with their collections. They sat in their Dominy chairs and kept their socks in a Chapin tall-chest. This beautiful platter was part of their collection, and it served as a centerpiece for countless dinners.
————
The Wheelock collection was one of the largest and finest gatherings of local artifacts on Long Island. William E. Wheelock’s son, John Hall Wheelock, gave the entire contents of their cottage to the East Hampton Historical Society. The rarest pieces were displayed in 1978 at Clinton Academy and can be seen at our Mulford Farmhouse every summer.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Virtual Book Club 

——————

A Day Like Any Other:

The Great Hamptons Hurricane of 1938

by Genie Chipps Henderson

————
Join the EHHS for their virtual Book Club as they explore A Day Like Any Other: The Great Hamptons Hurricane of 1938 a novel by Genie Chipps Henderson on May 13 at 7:00pm on Zoom.
————
This is a thrilling story of a day that began much like any other at the ragtag end of the summer season on the eastern end of long island – better known as the Hamptons. The Storm, coming without warning, caught the summer colonists and locals alike off guard as it made landfall at 3:00pm. It brought with it unprecedented wind, rain, and waves so powerful they were recorded on seismographs 5000 miles away in Alaska.
————
Henderson’s skillful storytelling is based on carefully researched facts and woven into an amazing story with compelling characters.
————
Historic photos and research will be shared by the Author who will be joining the discussion, as well as items from the Society’s archive.
————
If you have any photos you would like included, please email info@easthamptonhistory.org.
————
Thursday, May 13, 2021
7:00pm
No charge
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In case you missed the Virtual Winter Lecture Series – When Neighbors Were Neighbors: Character Studies by Cornelia Huntington 1803-1890, from Her Diary with Barbara Borsack and High King!    
————————————-
————
This special live Zoom event takes virtual visitors on a tour of world famous artist studios — national landmarks located in East Hampton, New York. Doors virtually open to the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center at 4pm, and then participants visit the Thomas and Mary Nimmo Moran Studio at 4:30pm on guided tours using Zoom. There is no charge, but registration is required.
——————
Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center
with Education Coordinator, Joyce Raimondo
———–
Education Coordinator, Joyce Raimondo will virtually guide visitors through Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner’s home and studio – a national landmark located in East Hampton, New York. Discover creative ways Pollock and Krasner expressed their feelings with paint. Discuss the art displayed in their home and explore the barn studio filled with paint splatters — evidence of their masterpieces.
———–
Pollock is best known for applying house paint from sticks onto canvases placed on the floor of his barn studio. He walked around all four sides of the paintings as he created imagery that captures movement and energy. Krasner, also an abstract painter, is known for her innovative technique of cutting up earlier work to create new painting/collages.
——————
THOMAS & MARY NIMMO MORAN STUDIO
with Chief Curator, Richard Barons
————
Join Chief Curator, Richard Barons, on a virtual tour of the Thomas & Mary Nimmo Moran Studio – national historic landmark, located in East Hampton, New York. In 1884, Moran built the first artist’s studio in East Hampton which marked the beginning of the village as an artist’s colony. The Moran Studio has been described as “a quirky, Queen Anne style-studio cottage.” Thomas Moran is widely known for his landscape paintings of the Rocky Mountains, and Mary Nimmo Moran for her landscape prints, particularly her etchings.
————
Wednesday, May 12, 2021
4:00pm
No charge
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

East Hampton Historical Society
631-324-6850

—————

======================================== 

AAQ / Resource

Sotheby’s International Realty

______________________________________________