February news & updates

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2/5/21 Issue 4
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Upcoming Events

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East Hampton From the Church Belfry from Picturesque America, William Cullen Bryant, 1872-1874
Gift: Gerson & Judith Leiber
From the permanent collection.
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The 2021 Online Winter Lecture Series:
In Their Own Words
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Friday, February 26, 2021, 7:00pm
Life in a Small Town: Lyman Beecher’s Reflections on East Hampton from 1798 to1810
Speaker: Richard Barons
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Friday, March 26, 2021, 7:00pm
When Neighbors Were Neighbors: Character Studies by Cornelia Huntington (1803-1890) from Her Diary
Speakers: Barbara Borsack and Hugh King
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Friday, April 30, 2021, 7
Turn-of-the Century Tales: from “Wainscott Dumplings” by Alice E. Osborn Hand (1879-1968)
Speaker: Hilary Osborn-Malecki
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Contact Marianne for more information.
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Make it Monday – Victorian Valentines
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The year is 1880 and you want to make your friend, your parents, or your pet a Valentine. What are you going to use to make them?
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In this virtual session of Make it Mondays, Activities You Can Do at Home, Director of Experience, Marianne Della Croce will demonstrate how to make your own Victorian Valentine with some common household items. This is appropriate for ages 7-13. $25 per person.
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Registration for this session includes a kit containing lace, cardstock, and Victorian Valentine designs. From home, you will need glue, scissors, a pen or pencil, and any other decorating supplies you would like to use!
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Pick up your kits on Friday, February 19 from 2pm-4pm at the Osborn-Jackson House, 101 Main Street in East Hampton. Call 631-324-6850 ext. 4 for your pick up time.
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From the Collection
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This embossed cut-out card probably represents the fashion of the members of the court of Louis XV, who dressed up as shepherds and shepherdesses, as they frolicked in the grand gardens of Versailles. How often has France been a symbol of love?
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This card was published in the late 1910s.
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From the permanent collection.
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Your Help is Needed!
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The East Hampton Historical Society, like so many other non-profits, relies on public support to continue our mission of the preservation of the history and the culture of our community, and we need your help!
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Please consider supporting our Annual Appeal as we move into our centennial year of 2021 as YOUR historical society.
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Your generous donation goes to preserving these important landmarks for future generations and ensuring we can continue to offer an exceptional calendar of events and programs.
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Thank you in advance for your support!
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Membership Matters
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Museums are just as important to the future as the future is to museums. Not only can our museums bring history to life, but they can also shine a light on both our present and our future.
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The East Hampton Historical Society has a responsibility and duty to provide a sense of community and place by celebrating a collective heritage, offering a great way to get to know the history of East Hampton, as well as inspiring the next generation to be stewards and caretakers of these wonderful buildings and artifacts.
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As we head into 2021, we look toward transforming our museums from spaces of looking and learning to spaces of interaction, participation, and engagement. As the world evolves, so shall we with innovative programming and new ways to utilize technology to improve the visitor experience.
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A great way to be apart of the excitement, is to join the Society as a member. Your membership helps us continue to tell the remarkable stories of EastHampton, and to ensure we will be standing for years to come – and entitles you to great benefits!
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Join (rejoin) today!
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WE LOVE HISTORY!

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During February, the month of love, it is only natural that we discuss what we love…history! Those of us who work at the Society definitely love history. We love history in general and East Hampton historyin specific. How could we not?
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This month, many of you may receive the traditional Valentine candy, Sweethearts. Those are the small heart treats that have a variety of short sayings on them, and funny enough, several of these messages can be used as a jump off to discuss just why
WE LOVE HISTORY!
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BE TRUE What is it that historians strive to uncover? Truth. We research far and wide to gather information from both primary sources and memory to formulate the narrative of whatever historical story we share. We know, however, that the seeking of what is true is continually broadened and refined as new information is discovered. History truly is a moving target for historians as investigators of the past.
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HOT STUFF The crazy ups and downs, hot and cold periods of history is certainly that which lures us to study history. The flames of passion, personalities, wars, social change, and adventure ignite in us the desire to know more. It is through those “hot” stories, we can learn, perhaps even avoid the pitfalls of the past. The old adage is true, the more things change, the more they stay the same.
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YOU & ME Wow is often the historian’s response when they discover a new piece of information about a topic. We cannot contain it! That is where you come in…we want to share it with you. It is the relationship between us, you & me, the museum and the public. Our responsibility to share and our excitement to foster reciprocity with the public is strong. We are in this together, our shared history.
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TRUE LOVE As trained professionals, our true love is our museum work, it is a vocation. We went through advanced education, spend hours with documents and objects, and remain nothing short of committed. History (& museums) are our one true career love.
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Many of you feel the same, that your local history within the greater context of national and world events is your LOVE. That is why you continue to support and participate in our Society and its programs and events.
So, please know that during this month of love, WE MISS YOU and look forward to seeing you in person this 2021 season. We hope you participate on all our great online programs this winter and spring, and we are sending you sincere XOXO for being a part of what we do…love history.
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Maria Vann
Executive Director
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Volunteer Spotlight

Rip Georges

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During the mid-1980s, Rip Georges was a magazine designer and creative director living in Santa Barbara, CA with his wife, Jennifer. They moved to Bedford, NY when an opportunity arose for Rip to redesign Esquire magazine. During the early 1990s, a friend invited them for a visit to EastHampton and the Georges immediately fell in love with it. By the mid-1990s they were regular weekend visitors, and they decided to make EastHampton their permanent home to raise their three children: Jillian, Christopher, and Cary.
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When he moved to East Hampton, Rip was truly taken with the architecture, but knew very little about the town itself. And so, he spent a great deal of time in the library learning as much as he could. He became aware of the Society through his wife’s volunteerism with the Ladies Village Improvement Society, and the relationships she developed there with members of the historicalsociety. Rip regularly attended our Winter Lecture Series and then he began to volunteer with the Society, assisting with graphic design work. He became a member of the Society’s communications committee and is now a member of the Board of Directors.
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Rip believes that the Society’s mission, to collect, preserve, present, and interpret the material, cultural and economic heritage of the town and its surroundings is an important one, and he enjoys being able to use his professional expertise to move the Society’s mission forward. He has a deep appreciation of the preservation work the Society does and has enjoyed learning about the inner workings of the non-profit world, as well as the complex decisions that are made in its governance. He likes being a part of the committee whose goal is projecting the Society’s best image while implementing those decisions.
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For fun, Rip and his wife regularly treasure hunt for antiques. He also enjoys cooking and returned to pottery-making after a fifty-year hiatus by joining a pottery group that meets in Water Mill. He is a new grandfather to Monty and spends as much time as possible with him too!
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Save the Date for the New Summer
Drop-Off Program!
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East Hampton Lil’ Explorers
August 2-6, 2021
9:30am-12pm
Children ages 7-12 will explore a different theme each day of the week:
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Monday – Young Writers
Tuesday – Forces of Nature
Wednesday – Games Galore
Thursday – Time Travelers
Friday – Concoctions and Potions
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Contact Marianne for more information.
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From the Collection
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If your girlfriend was of Irish descent, a young lad had this very green card to pick out at the local department store. “Utter, the thought in, those eyes of thine, Or whisper it to St. Valentine.” This is a fold-out card has the heart put-out to encompass this lass. The card dates from about 1915-1920.
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From the permanent collection.
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Don’t forget to shop the online store

for East Hampton Chocolates

and more!

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Curator’s Corner

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The heart has been a symbol of love since at least the Middle Ages. Though Aristotle is believed to have been the first western writer to define the visual shape of the heart, by the 14th century the familiar symbol we all recognize began to become standard. It was also the ancient Greeks who identified the heart as the human organ that could quake with passionate emotions. In Roman times, Venus used cupid to set mortal hearts on fire with a well aimed arrow. So today the heart shaped candy box or red heart emoji spells LOVE in most cultures of the world.
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As the cold winter winds begin to take hold of the South Fork with Valentine’s Day right around the corner, we go to our collections to find the perfect East Hampton representation of love. What better place to look than our collection of locally made bedcovers. Just the staggering amount of time spent piecing, stuffing and sewing a quilt represents the love of keeping one’s family warm. Some East Hampton quilters went the extra step to create unique patterns for their loved ones.
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The “Wolf Quilt” was made by Mary Ann Bennett sometime before 1904 when she died at 53. We tend to date it about 1900, because the quilt was never finished. One of its squares (all original designs, many incorporating family history) features an illustration of four wolves, commemorating Edward Bennett’s bounty of two pounds for their killing in 1691. There are 96 squares and three of them use the heart symbol in various patch-work patterns. Other designs and symbols include birds, horses, a squirrel, flowers, scissors, acorns, oak leaves and a hand print. Various family initials of the quilter, her grandmother and children are scattered about the squares.
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Mary Ann Bennett’s quilt is a masterpiece of American folk art. It was exhibited at the American Folk Art Museum and chosen for the New York Quilt Project and illustrated in “New York Beauties: Quilts from the Empire State” by Jacqueline Marx Atkins & Phyllis A. Tepper.
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East Hampton
631-324-6850

East Hampton Historical Society

101 Main Street, East Hampton, NY 11937

6313246850

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AAQ / Resource: Riverhead Buick | GMC

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