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LongHouse Reserve 2022 Season

Opens April 30

Rites Of Spring Celebration

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Commissioned Installations From

The Ladd Brothers Cheng Tsung Feng

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New Art In The Garden By

Bjorn Amelan 

Niki de Saint Phalle 

Alexander Polzin 

Byung-Hoon Choi 

Moko Fukuyama

Maren Hassinger 

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March 31, 2022 (East Hampton NY) — Longhouse Reserve announces its 2022 season, which opens on Saturday, April 30th with its annual Rites of Spring celebration. The garden will be blooming with spring flowers – nearly a million daffodils plus cherry trees, tulips, and magnolias, and many new works of art to find throughout the garden.

New art in the garden includes special commissioned installations.

Carrie Rebora Barratt, Director of LongHouse Reserve, said “LongHouse Reserve enters its 31st season with a vibrant program of art, design, music, dance, and horticulture, a tribute to our founder’s legacy of living with art in all its forms. Our season celebrates Land, Place, and Spirit, the coordinates at LongHouse that flow from the garden, the outdoor galleries, and the sanctuary created for peaceful contemplation and mindful gathering.”

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Right Here, Right Now, the Ladd Brothers’ first-ever outdoor sculpture, a woven, cedar- shingled portal, will be introduced on opening day. The artists, Steven and William Ladd, will be with us all day April 30th to talk with visitors about their piece and their belief in the extraordinary capacities of every human being and the awesome power of community.

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Cheng Tsung Feng Fish Trap

A second special commission opens in early July, when the Taiwanese national treasure, Cheng Tsung Feng, will create Fish Trap VI, a magical, human-scale bamboo pavilion based on traditional, ancient baskets for storing fish. Visitors to LongHouse will be able to watch Feng during the installation with his team from Taipei and interact with him in bamboo workshops.

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Niki de Saint Phalle’s The Poet and The Muse is 14′

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More new works of art on loan to LongHouse this year include nesting monuments from Maren Hassinger, a glowing bronze tree snag from Alexander Polzin, Sumi ink on canvas pictographs by Bjorn Amelan, a large lyrical piece from Niki de St Phalle, the Shrine (Hellgate Keepers) by Moko Fukuyama, a selection of works by Byung-Hoon Choi, and, come fall, a Tree of Many Fruits from Sam van Aken. These works join all of the LongHouse favorites, including works by Buckminster Fuller, Yoko Ono, Ai Wei Wei, Sol Lewitt, and Willem de Kooning.

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Maren Hassinger’s Monument 3

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Performing arts return to LongHouse in August with the classical pianist Llewellyn Sanchez-Werner playing under the stars on Jack Lenor Larsen’s birthday and master choreographer Abdul Latif creating a site-specific water ballet for the LongHouse pool.

Each of the artists featured this season will engage visitors in dialogue, conversation, and engaging education events for the entire community, including a new Saturday evening series on architecture, craft, and design, a collaboration with the Architect’s Newspaper. LongHouse is partnering with Hampton Pride during Pride Month, starting with the first ever parade in East Hampton on June 4, and a very special closing celebration on June 26. Special programming is also being created for Juneteenth and Family Day.

Walks in the garden are planned throughout the summer with master horticulturalist Holger Winenga.

LongHouse will hold its annual Summer party on July 23, a garden-wide gala with delicious food and drink, music, and the ever-popular art auction.

The annual Landscape Lunch will be on September 24 with a stellar group of honorees. Much more to come in the fall and early winter.

For the full schedule visit

www.LongHouse.org/pages/calendar

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News From LongHouse Reserve

As the garden comes alive in spring, LongHouse is preparing for everyone, with a re-invigorated commitment to the beauty and health of the garden. LongHouse is making a pledge to earth equity, removing chemicals from our processes, conserving water, and adopting best practices for the plants and for our garden staff.

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“The LongHouse garden is a sanctuary for restful visits,” says Barratt, “truly a place of awe, wonder, and repose, which is a blessing in these times. Over the season, we will offer walks, meditations, sound baths, and other peaceful activities.”

“LongHouse emerges from a long winter with renewed energy and promise, accessibility and openness” continues Barratt. “Over the last months, we have spent considerable time, thought, and emotional energy reckoning with our past, present, and future. Our staff continues to enhance our commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility in everything we do. We pledge to create a culture of openness and belonging for all. LongHouse staff are also working on myriad programs for all, including the Student Annual on June 14 and other programs for schools and our far-reaching community. Longtime curator Wendy Van Deusen will stay on to work on special projects related to Jack’s collections and his home. Lee Skolnick, a longtime friend of LongHouse, is providing expert guidance for the work needed on the house. LongHouse welcomes Glenn Adamson as Curator at Large, to advise on craft and design and create a Clay Invitational, honoring Jack’s love of ceramics.”

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Alexander Polzin’s Parthenope

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The Board’s work includes attracting new Trustees, revising our by-laws, the creation of term limits, with new processes for nominating and governance, and a commitment to fiduciary responsibility – the duty of caring for and loyalty to the magnificent gift that Jack Lenor Larsen has given to East Hampton.

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ABOUT THE ARTISTS

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Bjorn Amelan

The artist will exhibit his sumi ink pictographs on handwoven hemp sheets in the LongHouse Pavilion, a series he began working on while visiting Jack Larsen at LongHouse. In Amelan’s words, the pictographs are “suggestive of archaic writing systems(ideograms, pictographs) and live in the liminal space between the real, the evocative and the symbolic.” For more about this artist see: https://newyorklivearts.org/artist/bjorn-amelan/

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Byung-Hoon Choi

For more about this artist see: https://www.friedmanbenda.com/artists/byunghoon-choi

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Niki de Saint Phalle

Typical of her work, which is overtly feminist, performative, collaborative, and monumental, Niki de Saint Phalle’s The Poet and The Muse is 14′ tall and comes to the LongHouse as a loan from Salon 94. For more about this artist see: https://www.friedmanbenda.com/artists/byunghoon-choi/ Niki de Saint Phalle

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The Ladd Brothers

Steven and William Ladd have been making art since 2000. Their installation for LongHouse Right Here, Right
Now (photo above) is a large bridge-like structure (32’ x 8’ x 12’) with facades constructed out of disks of cedar branches collected from the artists’ county property, or as they explained in their proposal to LongHouse,

“This past year, more than ever, we were nourished by nature while on our property in Germantown, NY. That experience heavily influenced our concept for a work specifically created for an outdoor setting, a first in our practice. Cedar trees dot our land and when building, we became enamored with the wood. We cut small rounds from the branches and trunks, revealing the beautiful, soft, rose color. An immediate connection was made with the main threads of our art practice and we began to “weave” them into textiles, envisioning them as beads. These textiles become the walls and the ceiling of an all-encompassing space that will be situated near a pond and canopied by trees at LongHouse Reserve. The pathway through the work encourages engagement and an elevated shift in perspective and plays upon the meandering paths of the property.”

Steven Ladd and William Ladd, with help from their parents, will be installing Right Here, Right Now at LongHouse on April 20 and 21st and returning for an artist conversation and to participate in the Rites of Spring opening activities April 30th. For more about these artists see: http://www.stevenandwilliam.com

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Cheng Tsung Feng

Considered a national treasure in Taiwan, Feng studied the traditional techniques of working with bamboo before engaging them for his own designs. Having visited LongHouse last fall, he envisions a sculptural pavilion based on traditional Taiwanese fish traps and vernacular construction techniques with dimensions range from 15 –50 ft. wide and 30 ft. high. Parts of this installation will be fabricated with LongHouse-grown bamboo. The work is created in Feng’s studio in Taiwan, then disassembled and shipped to the United States for installation at LongHouse by Feng and his assistants in August in time for the Qixi Festival(Chinese Valentine’s Day). Feng will be teaching traditional bamboo techniques to young people as well as speaking at LongHouse to our arts and design community. This project is a first collaboration with the Taipei Cultural Center and the first US installation by Cheng Tsung Feng. For more about this artist see: http://www.chengtsung.com

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Moko Fukuyama

Inspired by Shinto spiritualism, Moko Fukuyama’s Shrine (Hell Gate Keepers) features a group of monolithic wooden sculptures evoked by the form and function of fishing lures. Shinto, Japan’s indigenous religion, seeks to cultivate a harmonious relationship between humans, “kami” (deities), and the natural world. Shrine (Hell Gate Keepers) also draws upon Fukuyama’s upbringing in Japan and her experience with recreational sport-fishing. The ‘lures,’ carved from logs whose curves, grain and burl inform Fukuyama’s sculptural interventions, pay homage to the Shinto legacy of developing the character inherent within a landscape. As an immersive monument, Shrine (Hell Gate Keepers) presents fish and forests as symbols of natural abundance, susceptible to principles of scarcity. The oak tree used for the sculpture was donated by East Woods School in Oyster Bay, Long Island, repurposed after it was knocked down by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. For more about this artist see: https://motokofukuyama.com 

Moko Fukuyama’s Shrine

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Maren Hassinger

In May, former Bridgehampton resident, Maren Hassinger, will install a standing rectangle monument that uses branches sourced from LongHouse’s grounds. It will be constructed with participation from the community, including visitors and members. Hassinger’s career has spanned more than four decades, exploring relationships between the industrial and natural worlds in a practice that is both meditative and critical. Currently, her work is focused on exploring issues of equality. For more about this artist see: https://marenhassinger.com

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Abdul Latif

This gifted choreographer has created a site-specific water ballet for the pool at LongHouse performed by dancers from ABT and NYCB and with music sung by Devon Tines. The work is a preview of a New York City season performed at CUNY school pools throughout the five boroughs. For more about this artist see: https://www.ald2dt.com

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Alexander Polzin

The Germany artist Alexander Polzin is loaning his sculpture Parthenope (Hommage à Helmut Lachenmann) to LongHouse for the 2022 -2025 seasons. Standing 9’ 8”x 2’ 6”, the hollow bronze tree trunk reveals a gold-leafed inside and hides a mirror in the base, to reflect natural light. A partial view though a crack in its bark reveals a life form inside. For more about this artists see: www.alexanderpolzin.com

 

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Llewellyn Sanchez-Werner

The gifted pianist plays Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, Chavez, and Stravinsky and more under the stars at LongHouse. The concert is generously underwritten by Barbara Tober. For more about this artist see: www.llewellynsanchezwerner.com

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LongHouse Reserve

LongHouse Reserve teaches living with art in all of its forms. We cherish the land, a nature reserve with thousands of living species; place, an institution to learn, explore and grow; and spirit; a relaxing sanctuary for a break from everyday life. With those aspects at heart, the 2022 season will be one to remember!LongHouse Reserve is a 16-acre sculpture garden and natural sanctuary located in East Hampton, NY. As many as 60 works of art, including sculptures by Buckminster Fuller, Yoko Ono, and Willem de Kooning can be viewed in the LongHouse gardens, which are open to the public from April to December with changing exhibitions each year. The gardens serve as a living case study of the interaction between plants and people in the 21st century.
LongHouse’s goal is to expand the imagination and appeal to visitors of all ages, with an education program providing students with docent-led school tours, online materials, internship activities, family-activity guides, and the LongHouse Scholarship Award.

LongHouse was founded by Jack Lenor Larsen (1927-2020), internationally known textile designer, author, and collector. Larsen’s 13,000 square foot house was designed by Charles Fourberg, a nephew of Walter Gropius, and based on the sacred shrine on the Ise Peninsula in Japan. A team is currently studying the future use of the house and welcomes thoughts from our visitors in our workshops and talks this summer.

LongHouse Reserve opens April 30 and will be open in May on Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays from noon until 4:45pm. From June through October, LongHouse is open Wednesdays through Sundays, from noon until 4:45pm.

A Membership allows you to visit LongHouse Reserve throughout the season. General admission is $15, $10 for seniors, with no charge for veterans or active-duty personnel. LongHouse is always free for anyone 18 and under and to College Students with a valid Student ID. More information is available at www.longhouse.org.

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LongHouse Reserve photograph © Jeff Heatley.

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AAQ / Resource: Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects

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