~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sunday, February 28th, 2 PM
————

Seamen of Color:

Living and Sailing from the Port of New London,

1640-1880

————
a zoom talk with historian Sandi Brewster Walker
————
Sandi Brewster-Walker, chair and acting executive director of the Long Island Indigenous People Museum & Research Institute, and NLMS trustee, will give a talk on the people of color whaling captains and crew on all sides of the Long Island Sound.
————
She will concentrate on New London County. However her talk will include seamen of color who came to New London from other parts of Connecticut to sail from its harbor. 
————
Ms Brewster-Walker will highlight the genealogies and experiences of these men, who hunted the whale during the years (1790-1860), their boarding houses, churches, and lives on shore. She also will discuss the types of whaling vessels, the journey destinations, shipwrecks, and desertions.  
————
Zoom details will be posted soon.
Sandi Brewster-Walker will begin her talk with information about the seamen of color onboard the ship/bark Merrimac(k) during her 5th thru 10th voyages to hunt the whale!
————
painting by Marek Ruzyk

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What’s Up at the Custom House –

January 31, 2021

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

New London Maritime Society – local friendly authentic
Telling the stories of New London’s waterfront
& preserving four historic maritime sites

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Keep Up with What’s Up

Sign up to receive this weekly email newsletter.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Merrimac Journal Update

Early on a fine morning in July of 1844, the ship Merrimac left New London harbor to begin a voyage that would last many months and take its crew halfway around the world in pursuit of whales. But, owing to a lack of wind, the Merrimac had to start its journey by being towed out to sea by a steam boat. So begins the 155 page manuscript that was given to the New London Maritime Society in 2020. It chronicles the travels of the Merrimac from 1844 to 1847, and then continues on another whaler, the General Williams, in 1852. 
————
And what an exciting story it is! There are the frantic whale chases followed by the tedious task of cutting and boiling. The unidentified author observes the USS Constitution in the harbor in Hawaii and walks the streets of Sydney, Australia. There are stops at exotic ports of call such as Pitcairn Island, some fifty years after its settlement by the mutineers of the Bounty. But there also were long, boring stretches at sea occasionally enlivened with welcome breaks to “gam” with other whaling ships, as well as moments of tension and threatened violence among the crew. And, throughout the narrative, he longs to be with his beloved wife.
————
Nearly all of the transcribed text of the manuscript can now be read online thanks to the efforts of our many volunteer scriveners. As more of the text is revealed, we are learning more about life aboard a whaler. We have found many clues to the probable identity of the writer, and there is more to be discovered. Stay tuned for more revelations!
———
–Laurie Deredita, NLMS librarian

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

www.nlmaritimesociety.org

———————–

======================================== 

AAQ / Resource: Apple Honda, Riverhead

________________________________________________________________________________