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It’s just warm enough to dive into the waters around Long Island, but have you ever thought about what’s growing underneath? The Long Island’s bays are fast becoming the next hot spot for seaweed aquaculture and native sugar kelp is becoming the kelp of choice for New York farmers.
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The New York Times wrote a piece last week highlighting some of the incredible kelp farmers in our area who are growing a crop that not only can be eaten as food but helps clean our waters as well. While our end of Long Island may be known for its farms and vineyards, these farmers hope to turn attention to the bounty of our coasts.
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The Shinnecock people here on Long Island have been cultivating seaweed in these waters for generations, and the Shinnecock Kelp Farmers – an Indigenous women-run collective – is keeping the tradition alive. A recent article about their work in the Sierra Club magazine points to the impact that this type of aquaculture could have in fighting climate change: “Seaweed cultivation holds promise as a new front in the fight against climate change. Kelp absorbs chemicals—nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon dioxide—that harm other marine life and fuel algae blooms. Beyond the ecosystem benefits of simply growing kelp, it can be harvested as a source of food and fertilizer.”
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🍷 Save the Date: July Walk & Wine

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Save the date for Walk and Wine, an evening hosted by Slow Food East End on July 12th at Bridge Gardens. From 5-7 pm enjoy a guided tour of the gardens with garden director Rick Bogusch, along the way you’ll taste a curated collection of wine from Salt Bird Cellars while you learn more about the history and plantings of the naturalized gardens.
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Guests are welcome to wander, taste, and mingle. Stay tuned for how to purchase tickets. All proceeds will benefit Slow Food East End Feed the Forks initiatives which includes developing school and neighborhood gardens, promoting educational activities, combating food insecurity with grassroots efforts like Flour Power, and ongoing efforts to address climate change.
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The rain date is July 13.
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📚 What We’re Reading

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On the topic of kelp farming: Learn about the basics of aquaculture and the ins-and-outs of the AQUAA Act from SFUSA Policy Coordinator, Eryn Kelly.
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And another bounty of our waters – oysters! Long Island native and food writer, Alicia Kennedy, interviews D.C. Chef Rob Rubba who defines sustainability in his restaurant as local vegetarian food (plus oysters).
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In some parts of the world, they’re staples. In others, they’re specialty items, rarely seen outside a martini. Whetstone Journal examines the olive’s rise to popularity and what its place in the supermarket means.
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This new cookbook offers a guide to Juneteenth—and black celebration culture.
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🍞 Bake bread with us!

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Do you want to try your hand at baking homemade bread, and give back to your community?
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Everyone is welcome to join our Flour Power program, whether you’re a seasoned baker or want to try your hand at it for the first time.
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Join in the fun and give back to our community every other Monday.
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Click here to learn more and register for the next baking cycle on Monday, June 20. Plus, check out our Facebook group for bakers.
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🐌 News from the Slow Food network

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Do you have your guide to Slow Wine for 2022?
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Slow Wine Guide USA is the nation’s only eco-curated guide to the wines of California, New York, Oregon and Washington. Thanks to the team of 15+ expert wine writers, it selects eco-friendly wineries, reviews only wines that are farmed without synthetic herbicides, and is updated annually. Special categories help readers quickly find everyday wines, Top wines or Slow Wines (which are wines that honor heritage practices) and wineries awarded with Snail, coin and bottle accolades.
Slow Food Live presents:
Meating the Future
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What’s the Slow Food take on our growing spectrum of “meats”? Join an expert panel of nutritionists, activists and scientists who will explore plant and cell-based alternatives to farmed meat from several perspectives, including taste, nutrition, cultural significance, human and environmental health, animal welfare, and producer and eater equity.
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AAQ / Resource: Bruce Nagel + Partners Architects

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