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“HISTORY AS YOU LIKE IT”

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Interior of a flour mill; 1767, Brush drawing in brown wash.
© The Trustees of the British Museum

Mary Who?

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“Behind every great man is a great woman,” as the saying goes. In the case of Barnabas Horton (1600–1680), the great or more precisely, the influentialwoman was his second wife, Mary Langton. Their marriage of convenience propelled Barnabas to New England and ultimately to Southold. Without Mary, Barnabas would have probably died in England, unknown in America today.
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Barnabas and Mary married while at the peak of his earning power as master bread baker. In 17th-century England, this meant Barnabas wasn’t wealthy or even middle-class, but just scraping by. The price of bread was regulated by law and so were his profits, while unregulated millers charged any price to process grain into flour. The Langton family of Wigston Magna, were grain millers going back at least three generations. Securing an extended discount from his in-laws on a major component of bread baking (flour), allowed Barnabas to save enough money to migrate. But to where?
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Again, Mary steered Barnabas in a fateful direction—to the town of Ipswich in Massachusetts Bay Colony where her brother Roger was already a freeman. Undoubtedly, Roger helped his brother-in-law and sister upon their arrival by offering lodging, advice, and most importantly, assurances to other settlers. At least two early Ipswich acquaintances became life-long friends. William Purrier witnessed an important land transaction. Matthias Corwin, born five miles from Barnabas in England, became his neighbor in Southold.
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Too long in the background, let’s recognize Mary Langton for providing the groundwork of Barnabas’s success in Southold.
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Jacqueline Dinan
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 1 Her brother, William, bequeathed separate wind mills to each of his two sons in his 1938 will. Transcription in Jacqueline Dinan’s In Search of Barnabas Horton (2015): XX.
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 2 The New England Historic and Genealogical Society’s Great Migration 1634–1635 series documented Roger Lancton/Lanckton’s arrival around 1634 and subsequent activities in Volume IV (I–L): 228–230. While the entry listed his origin as “unknown,” Roger’s relationship to Mary, Barnabas’s wife, is confirmed by the will of their mother, Mary Langton, dated January 6, 1639, who named Roger and his family, as well as “my daughter Mayrie Ortton…and her husband Barnabee Ortton.” [In Search of Barnabas Horton: 338–339.] 
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 3 Barnabas sold six acres of common land to Moses Pengry in 1642. George A. Schofield, The Ancient Records of the Town of Ipswich, from 1634–1650, Volume 1 (Ipswich, MA: George A. Schofield; 1899): image 84/144 [at Archive.org. Schofield’s book is unpaginated].
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4 Corwin was from Sibbertoft, Northamptonshire (Great Migration 1634–1635, Volume II (C–F): 264. Horton from Mowsley, Leicestershire (table stone in Southold’s Old Burying Ground). There’s no evidence they knew each other prior to migrating. 
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Miss the last museum education article, “The Icehouse Cometh”? Click the button below to read all about icehouses.
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WINE BY THE VINES

LIMITED TICKETS REMAINING!

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HARVEST DINNER

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CALL FOR ARTISTS

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A Call for Artists for the 10” x 10” Online Art Exhibition and Sale entitled: 

Ten Squared: Winter Wonders

Back by popular demand, Ten Squared is a fundraising exhibit and sale for the Southold Historical Museum. The theme of this winter exhibit is entitled Ten Squared: Winter Wonders. In this non-juried exhibition, artists are invited to submit pieces that are 10” x 10” excluding framing. Each work will be sold for $100, half of which will benefit Southold Historical Society. The online exhibit and sale will be Nov 15 – Dec 15, 2021.
“Winter” is a huge concept, so you’ll want to narrow down your creative ideas into a more cohesive theme. It might be winter on the North Fork, it might be a certain culture’s myths and traditions about winter, or it might be interpretations of winter seen through the eyes of different people. What are the natural processes governing winter? What animals and plants thrive during winter? Seasons of change are coming. Share your interpretation, literal or symbolic of Winter Wonders.
Artists are invited to submit up to 3 works which measure 10” x 10” and hang ready. All mediums are accepted. Art works should be dry. Please attach a label to the back of the artwork with Artist Name, Title, and Medium. (As noted: all artwork will be sold for $100.00, half which will benefit Southold Historical Museum.) Artists should visit the museum website at www.southoldhistorical.org for the artwork submission form and for more information.
Finished 10” x 10” works with submission forms are due by Friday, October 29, 2021. Please call the office at 631-765-5500 for drop off instructions. Unsold work must be retrieved by January 15, 2022 or it will be recycled. Instructions will follow for pick-up of unsold works.
For more information please email info@southoldhistorical.org (attn: art sale) or call 631.765.5500. 
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The Museum Office and Museum Gift Shop will be closed the Monday, October 11
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October 21
Wine by the Vines at Pellegrini Vineyards
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November 4
Annual Harvest Dinner @ O’Mally’s
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November 26
Annual Candlelight Tour
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December 4
Holiday Fair
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SOUTHOLD HISTORICAL MUSEUM

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AAQ / Resource

Bruce Nagel + Partners Architects

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