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MUSEUM EDUCATION

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As written in our bylaws, Southold Historical Museum has a number of standing committees. One that you might be familiar with is the Education of Youth committee. This committee develops and implements the school programs which we offer to local school districts throughout the year. A core group of about 10-12 members, they are supported by a larger pool of volunteers who give their time while Step Back in History Week is underway.
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Southold Historical Museum has also had a Museum Education Committee for a number of years. It was written into the bylaws about 5 years ago, but we didn’t have volunteers to fulfill it until recently. With direction from the Board President, the new Museum Education Committee is taking off and their focus will be on writing. Made up of a number of published fiction and non-fiction writers as well as researchers, the committee will be offering “History As You Like It.” The “History As You Like It” column will be history-based, but depending on the writer, might have a creative, a personal, or a document-based flair. We are trying something new! 
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Please click HERE to view the first short work by Rosemary McKinley featured on our website, or read below. Similar to the “Collections Corner”, we will archive these on our website so you can share with friends or refer back to them. The committee is particularly looking for YOUR FEEDBACK. Would you mind sending us a line or ringing us on the phone to let us know what you think about “History As You Like It”? Inquiring minds want to know.
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The Icehouse Cometh

My fascination with ice houses stems from my past. My grandfather was an ice man in Sea Cliff, NY in the 1920’s on. So, when I stepped into an icehouse in Southold, from long ago, I was hooked. Many are round and were built into the ground for insulation, and all predate electric refrigeration. These were usually built out of bricks, domed at the top, and farmers had them on their property to keep eggs, milk, and meat from going bad. Often, they were built near freshwater lakes or rivers for easy access. In the 1800’s in the dead of winter here on the East End, men would take sleds pulled by horses to freshwater ponds and cut the ice to place on the sleds. Then they would transport the ice to the ice houses on farm properties. Inside they dug down into the ground, below the frost line to keep the ice cold and stuffed each layer with straw as an insulation. Food was kept cold for up to a year! Amazing old technology, and it worked!

Rosemary McKinley

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October 21
Wine by the Vines at Pellegrini Vineyards
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November 4
Annual Harvest Dinner @ O’Mally’s
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November 26
Annual Candlelight Tour
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December 4
Holiday Fair
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SOUTHOLD HISTORICAL MUSEUM | www.southoldhistorical.org|631-765-5500 |info@southoldhistorical.org
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AAQ / Resource: Townsend Manor Inn

Old Fashioned Hospitality

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