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In Process @ The Watermill Center

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A Glimpse Into the Creative Process of Nile Harris,

Helen Betya Rubinstein, Adam Lenz & Miki Orihara

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WATER MILL, NY (April 25, 2022) – The Watermill Center, an interdisciplinary laboratory for the arts and humanities located in Water Mill, will host the third of it’s 2022 In Process series with an intimate look into the work of American interdisciplinary performer Nile Harris, author Helen Betya Rubinstein, composer Adam Lenz, and dancer Miki Orihara on Thursday, May 26.

In Process @ The Watermill Center is an ongoing series of open rehearsals and studio visits that invites audiences of all ages and backgrounds to gain insight into how artists from across the globe develop new work. Attendees are invited to visit the studio of each artist for a presentation of the work they are developing during their residency at The Center, followed by a brief Q&A.

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“This group of artists is exciting for us, as they are all intimately interacting with and drawing inspiration from The Center in unique ways,” shares Elka Rifkin, Director of The Watermill Center. “Each artist is exploring the facilities, The Watermill Collection, or our grounds as a space to experiment and reflect on their work. It’s amazing to have artists on site who are so deeply engaged and inspired by the full breadth of resources available here at The Center, from our facilities and grounds to our collection and library. Their varied explorations and approaches offer new insights into The Watermill Center for visitors during In Process.”

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Nile Harris is a recipient of the 2022 Baroness Nina von Maltzahn Fellowship for the Performing Arts at The Watermill Center, which supports the work of emerging and established artists in the fields of theater, performance art, music, and dance. During his fellowship at The Center, Harris will continue the development of this house is not a home, which sets an improvised physical score inside of a sound-responsive bounce castle. Interweaving sonic feedback as a malleable material, the unique vocal utterances of the cast create a biometrically unique musical composition that cannot be repeated. The piece is made in collaboration with performer Malcolm-x Betts and composer slowdanger.

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Photo: Harris,Nile_LovisOstenrik

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“I first attended a program at The Watermill Center in 2017. What brought me there was the legacy of Bob Wilson’s work and curiosity to know more about his pedagogy, and what brought me back was the unique community of international arts practitioners, scholars, and curators that engaged the site and continue to make it what it is today,” shares Harris. “In a way, this residency feels a bit like a homecoming. I am excited for dedicated time and resources to continue furthering my practice and developing this show. The work is interdisciplinary in nature and often falls through the cracks of many traditional presenting institutions. It feels very comforting to be entrusted with the space and to make it my own, even for a brief period of time.”

Photo: Harris,Nile_FillItWithAirCallItSelfCare_TijDoyen.png

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During her residency, Helen Betya Rubinstein will continue research and development of Monochrome with Misbehavior: On Gender & the Irregular, a collection of essays addressing questions of gender and the “irregular” using a sidelong, formally subversive approach. Drawing on personal experience, conversation, and readings in queer theory, these essays wonder about the impact of feminism’s second wave on the bodies and lives of those who grew up in its wake. 

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“I’m drawn to The Watermill Center’s interdisciplinary nature, its interest in collaboration, and its location,” shares Rubinstein. “Interacting with different ecosystems and environments is part of my process in general, and is relevant to this project in particular as I consider questions of nature, the “natural,” and (eco-)aesthetics.” 

Photo: Rubinstein,Helen

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During their stay at The Center, composer Adam Lenz and dancer Miki Orihara will begin to finalize the sound and choreography of Bell Child, based on the work of acclaimed sculptor Isamu Noguchi. Bell Child is a work for dance and electronic audio that serves as a meditation on Noguchi’s sculpture of the same name. The project reflects on Noguchi’s lesser-known ceramic works and his personal biography and seeks to open a discussion about the challenges of cross-cultural identity. 

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“The Watermill Center has become a creative home for me,” says Lenz. “I have been visiting the site for nearly a decade to collaborate with Bob and other artists, as well as to support the activities at The Center. Coming to The Watermill Center was the first time I felt like I was part of a community of artists. It is really meaningful to return this year to develop this project at a place that has been a major part of my creative development.”

Photo: Lenz,Orihara_MikiOrihara_John Deane

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The Watermill Center’s Artist Residency Program is process-based, providing artists with the time, space, and freedom to develop their work in a communal environment that encourages experimentation. Artists-in-Residence receives exclusive access to The Center’s expansive art collection, research library, theatrical archives, carefully curated facilities, and manicured grounds as tools in the creation of new and exciting work.

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Artistic Director, Robert Wilson

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The Watermill Center | 39 Watermill Towd Road, Water Mill, NY 11976

+1 (631) 726.4628

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AAQ / Resource: Bruce Nagel + Partners Architects

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