Whitney Museum of American Art
Installation view of Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist

VISIONARY SYMBOLISM IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

For Agnes Pelton, painting was a path to enlightenment, an expression of a higher consciousness within the universe. Using a vocabulary of largely abstract forms and delicate, shimmering veils of light, she portrayed her awareness of a world that lay behind physical appearances.

Extended through November 1, Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist offers visitors the chance to discover the work of this little-known symbolist, whose paintings are only now being fully recognized for their important place in early American modernism. Small in scale but vast in perspective, the forty-five works on view in this show present “a reminder that the history of modernist abstraction and women’s contribution to it is still being written.” (New York Times)

When you’re ready to explore Pelton’s paintings for yourself, begin planning your next trip to the Whitney and learn everything you need to know to enjoy your visit safely.

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Installation view of Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist

GALLERY VIEWS

Can’t make it to the Whitney right now? Take a virtual tour of the exhibition’s galleries with photos of the works on view.

VIEW NOW

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Gilbert Vicario, ed., Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist (Hirmer Verlag, 2019).

EXHIBITION CATALOGUE

This richly illustrated book explores Pelton’s role within American art history and her devotion to painting spiritual abstractions, which the artist saw as a means to convey her “light message to the world.”

BUY NOW

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EVENT HIGHLIGHTS

PaJaMa, Glenway Wescott, Fire Island, c. 1940.

ART HISTORY FROM HOME

Thursdays at 12 pm
Tuesdays at 6 pm

This series of talks by the Whitney’s Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows highlights works that illuminate critical topics in American art. Join us for upcoming talks exploring the relationship between art and activism, LGBTQ perspectives in pre-Stonewall artworks, and artistic responses to the Mexican Revolution.

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José Clemente Orozco, Prometheus, 1930.

AFTER LOS TRES GRANDES: AESTHETIC AND POLITICAL LEGACIES OF MEXICAN MURALISM

Thursday, September 24, at 6 pm

Curator Barbara Haskell and author Alejandro Anreus discuss los tres grandes—Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—and how the artistic and ideological differences among these Mexican muralists impacted their individual receptions during their time in the U.S.

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Arlene Dávila, Latinx Art: Artists, Markets, and Politics (Duke, 2020).

LATINX ART: ARTISTS, MARKETS, AND POLITICS

Thursday, October 1, at 6 pm

This conversation between Arlene Dávila and Adriana Zavala will take a critical look at the global contemporary art market and uncover the ways in which its practices contribute to the erasure and whitewashing of Latinx artists.

LEARN MORE

Photograph by Filip Wolak

ART COLLEGE NIGHT

Fridays, October 2 and 9, at 4 pm

Is your teen interested in a career in the arts? Have them join us online for our annual Art College Night—a two-part event exploring many aspects of the college admissions process, including scholarship opportunities, tips for writing college essays, and more.

LEARN MORE

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THE WHITNEY ON INSTAGRAM

Georgia O'Keeffe, Summer Days, 1936

Goodbye to a summer like no other.

In Georgia O’Keeffe’s Summer Days, the animal skull and vibrant flowers are symbols of life and death. The deer, horse, mule, and steer skulls she collected while living in New Mexico became potent souvenirs of a landscape that deeply inspired her. As O’Keeffe explained, “The bones cut sharply to the center of something that is keenly alive in the desert.”

See this work for yourself on your next visit to the Whitney, and remember that tickets are Pay What You Wish through September 28.

FOLLOW ALONG

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2020 CENSUS

There’s only one week left to complete the 2020 Census and make your voice heard! Participating in the Census is quick, easy—and important. This vital count will determine our number of Representatives in Congress and how federal funds are allocated to New York State for food assistance, health care, social services, school grants, public housing, parks, culture, and so much more.⁣

Let’s all do our part to shape the future of our great state and make sure we don’t lose out on critical resources.

COMPLETE THE CENSUS

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SUPPORT THE WHITNEY

Now more than ever, we are relying on the generosity of our supporters to help champion American art and artists. Please consider making a donation or becoming a member today.

MAKE A DONATION
BECOME A MEMBER
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Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street New York, NY 10014
whitney.org

      

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AAQ / Resource: Kolb | Heating + Cooling 

North Fork / South Fork / Shelter Island

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Image credits:Installation view of Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, March 13–November 1, 2020). Photograph by Ryan Lowry

Installation view of Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, March 13–November 1, 2020). From left to right: Mother of Silence, 1933; Departure, 1952; Awakening (Memory of Father), 1943; Light Center, 1947–48. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

Gilbert Vicario, ed., Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist (Hirmer Verlag, 2019).

PaJaMa, Glenway Wescott, Fire Island, c. 1940. Gelatin silver print, frame: 11 × 14 in. (27.9 × 35.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Jack Shear P.2020.10

José Clemente Orozco, Prometheus, 1930. Fresco, 20 ft. × 28 ft. 6 in. (6.1 × 8.7 m). Pomona College, Claremont, California. © 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City

Arlene Dávila, Latinx Art: Artists, Markets, and Politics (Duke, 2020).

Photograph by Filip Wolak

Georgia O’Keeffe, Summer Days, 1936. Oil on canvas, 36 1/8 × 30 1/8 in. (91.8 × 76.5 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Calvin Klein 94.171. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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