Whitney Museum of American Art
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ARTPORT: THE WHITNEY’S HOME FOR NET ART

There’s never been a better time to explore artport—our online gallery space for commissions of net art and new media art.

For nearly twenty years, artport has provided access to original artworks commissioned specifically for artport by the Whitney, documentation of net art and new media art exhibitions at the Whitney, and new media art in the Museum’s collection.

“Net art has tremendously changed over the decades as technological possibilities have changed,” says Christiane Paul, adjunct curator of digital art. “I often find that net art has become more subversive, more politically engaged, really investigating how collectivity plays out on the web.”

Whether you’re examining projects that investigate broader questions of the role of donors in building museum collections or the status of women and the female body in the Middle East, journeying through a website advertising a fictitious New York City apartment that covers more than 300 million square feet, or taking in a series of works created specifically for whitney.org to mark sunset and sunrise in New York City every day, there’s something for everyone to explore on artport.

VISIT ARTPORT

UPCOMING ONLINE EVENTS

Christina Quarles, Hard Pressed, 2017.

ART HISTORY FROM HOME

Thursday, July 9, at 12 pm
Tuesday, July 14, at 6 pm

These thirty-minute talks by the Whitney’s Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows highlight works in the Museum’s collection to illuminate critical topics in American art. Upcoming talks will explore the artistic potential of our immediate domestic environments and abstracted representations of the human body.

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Diego Rivera, Flower Festival: Feast of Santa Anita, 1931.

SUMMER STUDIO

July 14, 15, 17, and 18, at 11 am

We invite kids, teens, and families to join us for free weekly art classes this summer, where participants will experiment, create, and learn together with at-home art materials. This week we’ll be making murals inspired by the Mexican muralists and their fight for social change.

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Arlene Shechet, A Night Out, 2011.

ARTMAKING FROM HOME: DIY POTTERY

Friday, July 10, at 1 pm

Experiment with ordinary materials in new and creative ways with these online artmaking events designed for all ages. This Friday, we’ll take inspiration from Betty Woodman and Arlene Shechet as we mix our own clay and explore hand-building techniques to create ceramic sculptures.

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Theaster Gates, still from Do you hear me calling? Mama Mamama or What Is Black Power?, 2018.

WHITNEY SCREENS

Friday, July 10, at 7 pm

Tune in for our screening of Theaster Gates’s Do you hear me calling? Mama Mamama or What Is Black Power?—a fusion of music, performance, archival images, and sound that articulates the powerful spiritual, political, and cultural underpinnings of Black American civic life.

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#WHITNEYFROMHOME ON INSTAGRAM

Hank Willis Thomas, Strike, 2018.
“All my work is about framing and perspective, history and context.”—Hank Willis Thomas

In this stainless steel sculpture, Strike (2018), Thomas directly references a 1935 lithograph by Louis Lozowick. The lithograph, which Thomas saw at the Whitney in our 2015 exhibition America Is Hard to See, shows a Black man defending himself against a police officer’s aggression during a worker’s strike. Rather than reproducing the entire scene, however, Thomas removes the lithograph’s main action, focusing instead on two limbs in direct opposition, as one hand seizes the wrist of the other. Even without the larger narrative depicted in Lozowick’s work, a clear message of protest and resistance comes through in Thomas’s sculpture, largely due to the presence of the police baton.⁣ ⁣In the context of the United States’s deep history of police brutality inflicted upon its Black citizens, juxtaposing these two artworks—created nearly eighty-five years apart—emphasizes the history of violence in America and the long road Black communities have faced in their struggle for equality in a country founded on notions of freedom and the pursuit of happiness, a contradiction Thomas regularly addresses in his practice: “Almost all of my work is really about trying to reconcile how, in this great country, we continue to allow things that are so antithetical to our values to exist.”

FOLLOW ALONG

SUPPORT THE WHITNEY

Now, more than ever, we need your help to advocate for American art and artists and to present the riches of our collective cultural heritage. Please consider making a donation or becoming a member today.

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Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street New York, NY 10014
whitney.org

      

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Image credits:A screenshot of 0 to 1 / 1 to 0 by exonemo

Christina Quarles, Hard Pressed, 2017. Acrylic on canvas, 60 × 56 in. (152.4 × 142.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Karen Robinovitz P.2019.5. © Christina Quarles

Diego Rivera, Flower Festival: Feast of Santa Anita, 1931. Encaustic on canvas, 78 1/2 × 64 in. (199.3 × 162.5 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York; gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, 1936. © 2020 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, New York

Arlene Shechet, A Night Out, 2011. Glazed ceramic, 57 × 21 1/2 × 16 1/2 in. (144.8 × 54.6 × 41.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Adam Sheffer in memory of Bradley Carmel T.2019.814a-d. © Arlene Shechet

Theaster Gates, still from Do you hear me calling? Mama Mamama or What Is Black Power?, 2018. Two-channel video installation, color, sound; 42:40 min. Courtesy the artist and White Cube

Hank Willis Thomas, Strike, 2018. Stainless steel with mirrored finish, 32 3/4 × 32 1/4 × 7 1/4 in. (83.2 × 81.9 × 18.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Painting and Sculpture Committee 2019.324. ©️ Hank Willis Thomas⁣

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AAQ / Resource: Townsend Manor Inn

Old Fashioned Hospitality

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