Whitney Museum of American Art

EXTRACTING BEAUTY FROM A TIME OF CRISIS

Economic woes. Civil unrest. An uncertain future.

In the 1970s and early ’80s, New York City faced deteriorating conditions and a seemingly hopeless struggle for survival. But amidst the urban decay, New York’s artists were hard at work, confronting the numerous crises plaguing their city by mining new, innovative ways to create poetic experiences through art.

On view through November 1, Around Day’s End: Downtown New York, 1970–1986 takes a look at the various ways in which fifteen artists active in overlapping scenes in downtown Manhattan used their artistic practices to intervene in the urban fabric of the city.

From Gordon Matta-Clark and Joan Jonas presenting the city itself as a character in their art to Alvin Baltrop and Jimmy Wright’s depictions of queer life on the West Side piers, and more, Around Day’s End traces the ways the city’s artists produced work that examined downtown New York as site, history, and memory.

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PLAN YOUR VISIT

Begin planning your weekend trip, including everything you need to know to enjoy your visit safely. Book your tickets or become a member now.

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ASK A CURATOR: AROUND DAY’S END

Hear from Laura Phipps, assistant curator, and David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of Curatorial Initiatives, about the art, artists, and stories behind Around Day’s End.

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EVENT HIGHLIGHTS

ART HISTORY FROM HOME

Tuesdays at 6 pm
Thursdays at 12 pm

This series of talks by the Whitney’s Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows highlights works that illuminate critical topics in American art. Join us for upcoming talks exploring the Mexican Revolution and abstract art.

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AROUND DAY’S END: A CONVERSATION

Thursday, October 15, at 6 pm

Join us for a discussion of four key artists—Alvin Baltrop, David Hammons, Joan Jonas, and Gordon Matta-Clark—from the exhibition, covering individual works as well as the larger field of artistic practice in and around the city, particularly along the waterfront.

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VERBAL DESCRIPTION ONLINE

Friday, October 16, at 10 am

This tour offers visitors who are blind or have low vision the opportunity to experience the exhibition Around Day’s End: Downtown New York, 1970–1986. Through vivid verbal descriptions, participants will explore the role of the city in the work of artists active in overlapping downtown Manhattan scenes.

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ASK A CURATOR: AGNES PELTON

Tuesday, October 20, at 7 pm

Discover Agnes Pelton’s fascinating history, spiritual beliefs, and painting techniques from Barbara Haskell, curator, and Sarah Humphreville, senior curatorial assistant.

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THE WHITNEY ON INSTAGRAM

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FOLLOW ALONG

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Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street New York, NY 10014
whitney.org

      

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AAQ Resource / Townsend Manor Inn

Old Fashioned Hospitality

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Image credits:Gordon Matta‑Clark, Day’s End Pier 52.3(Documentation of the action “Day’s End” made in 1975 in New York, United States), 1975 (printed 1977). Gelatin silver print: sheet, 8 × 10 in. (20.3 × 25.4 cm); image, 7 × 9 3/4 in. (17.8 × 24.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Harold Berg 2017.134. © Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Anton van Dalen, Street Woman on Car, 1977. Graphite pencil on paper, 22 3/4 × 29 in. (57.8 × 73.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Drawing Committee 2016.7. © Anton van Dalen

Frida Kahlo, Me and My Parrots, 1941. Oil on canvas, 32 5/16 × 24 3/4 in. (82 × 62.8 cm). Private collection. © 2020 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Gordon Matta-Clark, Day’s End, 1975. Super 8mm film on HD video, color, silent; 23:10 min. Camera: Betsy Sussler. Electronic Arts Intermix. ©️ Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York

Hands hold a touch object of Alexander Calder’s wire sculpture The Brass Family, on view in the exhibition American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, December 22, 2012–June 29, 2014).

Agnes Pelton, Orbits, 1934. Oil on canvas, 36 1/4 × 30 in. (92.1 × 76.2 cm). Oakland Museum of California; gift of Concours d’Antiques, the Art Guild of the Oakland Museum of California

William Copley, Untitled (Think/flag), 1967, from the portfolio ARTISTS AND WRITERS PROTEST AGAINST THE WAR IN VIET NAM, 1967. Screenprint, 20 7/8 × 25 3/4 in. (53 × 65.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Print Committee 2006.50.4. © 2020 Estate of William Copley / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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