Whitney Museum of American Art
Brett Weston, Joshua Tree, Rocks, 1951.

SUMMER TRAVELS WITH ARTISTS

As health and safety measures across the U.S. continue to keep many at home instead of heading out on summer road trips, we’re thinking about the ways artists transport us across the globe—and beyond—through their work.

So even if you had to scrap your trip to Joshua Tree (photographed above by Brett Weston in 1951), there’s no need to feel creatively confined to your neighborhood. Let these artists serve as your guide as you journey to Fire Island, the North Pole, and even Mars.

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MARS WITH MPA

MPA, Amapola Prada, and Elizabeth Marcus-Sonenberg in the performance Orbit, (part of the exhibition RED IN VIEW), February 9–19, 2017
Anyone captivated by the idea of future travels to the Red Planet will definitely want to look back at Orbit, for which artists MPA, Amapola Prada, and Elizabeth Marcus-Sonenberg lived for ten days in February 2017 in the narrow space between the windowpanes of the Whitney’s Susan and John Hess Family Theater.

Take a look at photos and videos of the performance, and read the diary these artists kept throughout the duration of Orbit, which was inspired by simulation projects conducted to test the viability of human life on Mars.

VIEW THE LOG

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FIRE ISLAND WITH JARED FRENCH

Although Jared French’s painting State Park (1946) looks like a tranquil day at the beach, there’s more than meets the eye. In this sun-drenched scene, based on a photo the artist took during one of his frequent trips to Fire Island, French places symbols throughout the work to juxtapose coded homoerotic imagery with critiques of postwar family values.

Learn more about State Park in this video in American Sign Language.

WATCH NOW

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THE NORTH POLE WITH ELLIE GA

Still from "Ellie Ga: The Fortunetellers | Whitney Biennial 2019," 2019
For those not wanting to bake in the New York sun, Ellie Ga’s The Fortunetellers (2011) will transport you to far colder environs. In this narrative-based performance, the 2019 Biennial artist recounts her five-month expedition near the North Pole, superimposing live storytelling, recorded sound, and still and moving images to conjure up the rituals of daily life in the Arctic night.

In this excerpt, Ga gives you a taste of her experiences, which involved enduring average temperatures of -27 degrees Celsius.

WATCH NOW

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OUR UPCOMING EVENTS

Christina Quarles, Hard Pressed, 2017.

ART HISTORY FROM HOME

Thursday, August 13, at 12 pm
Tuesday, August 18, at 6 pm

This series of talks by the Whitney’s Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows highlights works in the Museum’s collection to illuminate critical topics in American art. Join us for upcoming talks exploring abstracted representations of the human body and the ways modern artists have engaged with erotic imagery.

LEARN MORE

Marlon Mullen, Untitled, 2018.

SUMMER STUDIO

Friday and Saturday, August 14 and 15, at 11 am

In the final week of our Summer Studio classes designed for kids, teens, and families, we’re taking inspiration from Marlon Mullen as we reimagine and transform our favorite book covers using at-home art materials.

LEARN MORE

VERBAL DESCRIPTION ONLINE

Friday, August 21, at 10 am

This tour offers visitors who are blind or have low vision the opportunity to experience the exhibition Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019. Through vivid verbal description, participants will explore how artists have explored the materials, methods, and strategies of craft over the past seven decades.

LEARN MORE

Ruth Asawa, Untitled (S.270, Hanging Six-Lobed, Complex Interlocking Continuous Form within a Form with Two Interior Spheres)

ARTMAKING FROM HOME

Friday, August 21, at 1 pm

Experiment with ordinary materials in new and creative ways with these online artmaking events designed for all ages. In this workshop, we’ll look at a range of approaches to working with suspension and motion to create our own suspended sculptures.

LEARN MORE

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THE WHITNEY ON INSTAGRAM

Pat Steir, July Waterfall, 1991.
Beat the summer heat under Pat Steir’s July Waterfall (1991).

This work belongs to Steir’s Waterfall series, a body of work begun in 1988 in which the artist explored the possibilities of dripping and flinging paint with full physical and expressive freedom. The artist approaches her subject with practiced delicacy, allowing the waterfalls (paint drips), in effect, to paint themselves. Straddling the divide between abstraction and representation, the literal and the metaphorical, the painting is a waterfall at the same time as it represents one. ⁣

FOLLOW ALONG

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FROM OUR FRIENDS

Still from Martin Margiela: In His Own Words, 2019. Image courtesy Film Forum

AT FILM FORUM—MARTIN MARGIELA: IN HIS OWN WORDS

Premiering Friday, August 14

Presented as part of Film Forum’s new Virtual Cinema series, Martin Margiela: In His Own Words profiles one of the most innovative and influential fashion designers of his time, one who has remained an elusive figure for the entirety of his decades-long career. Now, for the first time, the “Banksy of fashion” reveals his drawings, notes, and personal items in this exclusive, intimate portrait.LEARN MORE

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SUPPORT THE WHITNEY

Now more than ever, we are relying on the generosity of our supporters to help champion American art and artists. Please consider making a donation or becoming a member today.

MAKE A DONATION
BECOME A MEMBER

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AAQ / Resource: Riverhead Ford | Riverhead Lincoln

 

 

Image credits:Brett Weston, Joshua Tree, Rocks, 1951. Gelatin silver print, sheet: 8 × 9 15/16 in. (20.3 × 25.2 cm); image (irregular): 7 5/8 × 9 1/2 in. (19.4 × 24.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Christian K. Keesee 2002.442. © Brett Weston

MPA, Amapola Prada, and Elizabeth Marcus-Sonenberg in the performance Orbit, (part of the exhibition RED IN VIEW), February 9–19, 2017, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Photograph © Paula Court

Still from “Jared French, State Park | Video in American Sign Language,” 2018

Still from “Ellie Ga: The Fortunetellers | Whitney Biennial 2019,” 2019

Christina Quarles, Hard Pressed, 2017. Acrylic on canvas, 60 × 56 in. (152.4 × 142.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Karen Robinovitz P.2019.5. © Christina Quarles

Marlon Mullen, Untitled, 2018. Acrylic on canvas, overall: 42 1/4 × 52 in. (107.3 × 132.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Shane Akeroyd 2020.68. © Marlon Mullen

Hands hold a touch object of Alexander Calder’s wire sculpture The Brass Family, on view in the exhibition American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, December 22, 2012–June 29, 2014)

Ruth Asawa, Untitled (S.270, Hanging Six-Lobed, Complex Interlocking Continuous Form within a Form with Two Interior Spheres), 1955, refabricated 1957–1958. Brass and steel wire, overall: 63 7/8 × 14 15/16 × 14 15/16 in. (162.2 × 37.9 × 37.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Howard Lipman 63.38. © 2020 Estate of Ruth Asawa / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Image courtesy The Estate of Ruth Asawa and David Zwirner

Pat Steir, July Waterfall, 1991. Oil on canvas, 102 1/4 × 116 1/8 in. (259.7 × 295 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Robert Miller and Betsy Wittenborn Miller P.92.3. © Pat Steir

Still from Martin Margiela: In His Own Words, 2019. Image courtesy Film Forum

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