Whitney Museum of American Art
Installation view of Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945
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“WILL VIDA AMERICANA REMAIN ON VIEW WHEN THE WHITNEY REOPENS?”

It’s no surprise that this was the question we received most often during the Museum’s temporary closure. With themes of cross-cultural exchange and the important role art plays in protesting economic, social, and racial injustices, the exhibition has only become timelier given the events of the past five months.

That’s one of the reasons we’re excited to have extended Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945 through January 31, 2021—to give visitors even more opportunities to experience the show that changes the narrative of American art. Featuring nearly 200 works by over sixty Mexican and American artists, Vida Americana reveals the profound impact the Mexican muralists had on their counterparts in the United States during a time of cultural change, economic depression, and world war.

Start exploring the exhibition with the digital content below. And when you’re ready, begin planning your next trip to the Whitney. From our updated hours to new visitor guidelines and more, we’ve outlined everything you need to know to enjoy your visit safely. Remember to book your timed tickets in advance—and be sure to visit us before September 28 to enjoy Pay-What-You-Wish admission.

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Diego Rivera, Flower Festival: Feast of Santa Anita, 1931.
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MEXICAN MURALISM AND ART IN THE UNITED STATES

Curator Barbara Haskell sets the stage for the exhibition in this excerpted essay from the Vida Americana catalogue. (También disponible en español.)

READ NOW

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Still from "Los Tres Grandes | Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945," 2020
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LOS TRES GRANDES

Dive into the world of the Mexican muralists—José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—and learn how their revolutionary approaches to painting altered the course of American art.

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Still from "The Abelardo L. Rodriguez Market | Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945," 2020
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THE ABELARDO L. RODRIGUEZ MARKET

Journey through the halls of Mexico City’s vibrant Abelardo L. Rodriguez Market and get up close to murals produced in 1934 by a group of ten American and Mexican artists.

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GALLERY VIEWS

Can’t make it to the Museum right now? Take a virtual tour of the exhibition’s galleries with dozens of photos of the works on view.

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EVENT HIGHLIGHTS

Theaster Gates, Minority Majority, 2012.

ART HISTORY FROM HOME

Thursdays at 12 pm
Tuesdays at 6 pm

This series of talks by the Whitney’s Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows highlights works that illuminate critical topics in American art. Join us for upcoming talks exploring abstract art in America, art’s role in social change, and the influence of the Mexican avant-garde on American art.

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Ed Morales, Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture (Verso, 2018).

LATINX: ED MORALES IN CONVERSATION WITH CHON A. NORIEGA

Thursday, September 10, at 6 pm

Author, poet, and journalist Ed Morales speaks with media scholar and curator Chon A. Noriega about Latinx history and culture in the United States, as well as the evolution of the term Latinx and its relevance in the arts today.

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Tours for Immigrant Families Online photograph by Filip Wolak

TOURS FOR IMMIGRANT FAMILIES ONLINE

Saturday, September 12, at 11 am

We invite families with kids ages 5 and up who speak any language and all levels of English to join us online for fun activities inspired by exciting artworks on view in our galleries.

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THE WHITNEY ON INSTAGRAM

Aliza Nisenbaum, MOIA's NYC Women's Cabinet, 2016.
This Labor Day, we honor the work of immigrants.

Aliza Nisenbaum’s paintings celebrate the power of the individual as part of a community. Here, she portrays a group convened to discuss the empowerment of young women-identifying immigrants. The artist, who was born in Mexico and appears in a striped shirt on the left, was an inaugural fellow in the NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA). In the background of the painting, she reproduced a Mexican print from the 1950s showing a seamstresses’ union on strike. This image of women marching in solidarity resonated with her experience working with the Women’s Cabinet. Featured in the 2017 Whitney Biennial, Nisenbaum’s painting reflects the labor of care, generosity, and optimism.

FOLLOW ALONG

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SUPPORT THE WHITNEY

Now more than ever, we are relying on the generosity of our supporters to help champion American art and artists. Please consider making a donation or becoming a member today.

MAKE A DONATION
BECOME A MEMBER

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Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street New York, NY 10014
whitney.org

           

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Image credits:Installation view of Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945(Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, February 17, 2020–January 31, 2021). Photograph by Ryan Lowry

Diego Rivera, Flower Festival: Feast of Santa Anita, 1931. Encaustic on canvas, 78 1/2 × 64 in. (199.3 × 162.5 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York; gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, 1936. © 2020 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, New York

Still from “Los Tres Grandes | Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945,” 2020

Still from “The Abelardo L. Rodriguez Market | Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945,” 2020

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Installation view of Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945(Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, February 17, 2020–January 31, 2021). Photograph by Ron Amstutz

Theaster Gates, Minority Majority, 2012. Decommissioned fire hoses and vinyl on plywood, overall: 66 × 111 1/2 × 3 3/4 in. (167.6 × 283.2 × 9.5 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Barbara and Michael Gamson 2016.262. © Theaster Gates

Ed Morales, Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture (Verso, 2018)

Tours for Immigrant Families Online. Photograph by Filip Wolak

Aliza Nisenbaum, MOIA’s NYC Women’s Cabinet, 2016. Oil on linen, 68 x 85 in. (172.7 x 215.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Jackson Tang in honor of Christopher Y. Lew 2017.274. ©️ Aliza Nisenbaum

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AAQ / Resource: Lear + Mahoney Landscape Architecture

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