SUFFOLK COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

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MEMBERSHIP DRIVE

If you’ve been enjoying our Photo of the Week, please consider becoming a member of SCHS. The Suffolk County Historical Society, founded in 1886, collects and preserves the rich history of Suffolk County and beyond. We offer a history museum, art galleries, a research library and archives, and a multitude of exhibits, programs, and educational lectures and workshops year-round. Our unique collections reflect more than three centuries of Long Island history.

Click here to learn about Member Benefits!
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From the Civil War to civil rights, revolutions to restorations, spies to Suffragettes, boatbuilders to bootleggers, and whalers to wineries, Long Island’s history comes alive at the Suffolk County Historical Society! 

Interested in seeing more historical photos from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society? Spend an afternoon at our Local History Library perusing our extensive archival photography collectionsWe’re open Weds. – Sat., 12:30 – 4:30 PM. 

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK SERIES

The Suffolk County Historical Society’s PHOTO OF THE WEEK Series is created by head research librarian Wendy Polhemus-Annibell using historic primary source materials from our local history library’s extensive archives. To subscribe, visit our website or send an email request to Wendy at librarian@schs-museum.org 

To view our Photo of the Week archives, visit our website at www.SuffolkCountyHistoricalSociety.org

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: March 23, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Orville Young Photograph Collection

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian 

 

Suffolk County Courthouse in Riverhead, 1897, from the Orville Young Photograph Collection.  (Image from the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.) 

Our Orville Young Photograph Collection is an exceptional collection of images documenting the history and changing landscape of Suffolk County. The Youngs were residents of Riverhead, where Orville Young’s father, John Young (1845-1906), operated a planing and moulding mill. Orville Young (1876-1961) worked at his father’s mill, later inventing and building a number of early electrical engines. The Young mill was destroyed by fire in 1902, and was later replaced by Orville’s machine shop. John Elliot Young Jr. (1905-1987), Orville’s son, continued the business his father built until his own death in the 1980s 

Both father and son had a keen interest in photography, amassing over a thousand images documenting life on Long Island, with a particular focus on Suffolk County and the eastern end of the island. The collection includes images of Southold, Westhampton, Jamesport, Greenport, and many other locations, with the largest number of images documenting the vicinity in and around Riverhead. The subjects range from panoramic views of Riverhead taken from atop the old water tower and the Riverhead band on parade to images of farming and family life in the town. The collection is available to view in our library archives, Wednesday to Saturday, 12:30 pm to 4:30 pm. No appointment is necessary. 

 

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org

To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.

To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.

To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 

To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.

To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: March 16, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Flora of the Peconic River by Oren S. Ryker

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian 

Flora of the Peconic River, by Oren S. Ryker.  (Images from the Oren S. Ryker Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

The Suffolk County Historical Society’s Oren S. Ryker Collection was donated by the photographer in the 1970s. The images–over a hundred of them–depict native and non-native plant life growing along the shores of the Peconic River. The New Britton and Brown Illustrated Flora of the Northeastern United States (3 vols., NY Botanical Garden, 1952) was used by Oren Ryker to identify the plants by their Latin names. The above images are labeled as follows: Top row–Asclepia tuberosa (yellow butterfly weed), Asclepias syriaca (milkweed), Asclepias tuberosa (orange butterfly weed). Bottom row–Lechea maritima (beach pinweed), Iris versicolor (Blue flag iris), Lythrum salicaria (loosestrife).

Oren S, Ryker was born in Parsons, Kansas, in 1900, and by 1928 he was living with his wife in Riverhead. An accountant who enjoyed expressing his love of nature through photography, Ryker befriended noted botanical photographer Samuel Gottsho, and the two friends spent countless hours together canoeing and taking photographs along the Peconic River.

Ryker photographed these botanical images on large-sized, 2¼-inch Kodak Ektachrome transparency film. Ektachrome, initially developed in the early 1940s, allowed professionals and amateurs alike to process their own films. It also made color reversal film more practical in larger formats. Unlike the development process used by Kodachrome (technically intricate and beyond the means of amateur photographers and smaller photographic labs), Ektachrome processing was much simpler, and small professional labs could afford equipment to develop the film.

Over fifty images from the Oren S. Ryker Collection are currently on display in our festive Oh, Sweet Spring! exhibit, which runs until June 1, 2019, in our Gish Gallery. The images are also available for viewing in our library archives, Weds. – Sat., 12:30 pm to 4:30 pm.

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Gallery Hours: Weds. – Sat., 10: am – 4:30 pm

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: March 9, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian 

WOMEN’S  HISTORY MONTH: Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815 – 1902) 

Though Elizabeth Cady Stanton did not live to see New York women win voting rights in 1917, she was an early American suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women’s rights movement in New York State. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the Seneca Falls Convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, is often credited with initiating the first organized women’s rights and women’s suffrage movements in the United States. Stanton was president of the National Woman Suffrage Association from 1892 to 1900. Born in Johnstown, NY, she graduated from Troy Female Seminary in 1832.

Elizabeth’s father was an attorney who served in the New York State Legislature, in the U.S. Congress, and as a judge of the NY Supreme Court. As a child, Stanton would frequently be at her father’s office, where she overheard his conversations with clients. She recounted hearing stories of married women who were deprived under the law of their property:

Crouched outside her father’s law office, Elizabeth heard widow Flora Campbell inside pleading with Judge Cady…. Mrs. Campbell’s husband had willed the small farm she bought from her own earnings to their son, whose reckless and drunken ways were sure to bring ruin. That farm was hers by rights, she said, and she wanted it back. Judge Cady gently explained that under the law all of Mrs. Campbell’s property and earnings had belonged to her husband, who had the right to dispose of it as he wished. He showed her the law in the book on his shelf. There was nothing to be done. As Mrs. Campbell left, weeping, Elizabeth resolved to cut out the offending pages from her father’s law book.    — Sara M. Evans, Born for Liberty

Intelligent and active, Stanton began to rebel against the then-prevailing view that women were mentally and legally inferior to men, finding women of like mind in the antislavery and temperance movements. Working in collaboration with Susan B. Anthony for 50 years, Stanton became an accomplished writer and speaker. She published articles in newspapers, wrote speeches for Susan B. Anthony, drafted resolutions for annual conventions, and addressed the New York State Legislature on women’s rights.

After her husband’s death in 1887, Stanton moved to NYC but spent summers in Shoreham, which served as the summer headquarters of the woman suffrage movement. Every child who knew her in Shoreham was taught to say, “I believe in votes for women.” It was also in Shoreham that Stanton wrote her book, Eighty Years and More, Reminiscences: 1815-1897.   

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NEW ACCESSIBILITY ENTRANCE OPENS March 21st! 

 

We are proud to announce the March 21, 2019, Grand Opening of our new entrance wing!  Our new reception entrance incorporates all ADA-compliant handicap accommodations, including elevator, restrooms, and on-site handicap parking, improving access for all!

This project was made possible through major funding from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, New York State Council on the Arts, and Empire State Development.

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: March 2, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Elizabeth Oakes Smith

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian 

WOMEN’S  HISTORY MONTH: Elizabeth Oakes Smith (1806-1893), Patchogue. 

A champion of women’s rights, Elizabeth Oakes Smith was a gifted speaker as well as an author, poet, and playwright. She contributed poetry and prose to Godey’s Lady’s Book, Graham’s American Monthly, Southern Literary Messenger, and The Una, a mid-19th-century feminist journal owned, written, and edited entirely by women. Smith began her career as a temperance and antislavery advocate, and later became a spokesperson for the suffrage movement, lecturing with Lucretia Mott, president of the American Equal Rights Association. This group, which was founded in 1866, advocated the “right of suffrage, irrespective of race, color, or sex.” According to an article in the New York World, Smith and Mott traveled to Albany to petition the NY Legislature to reject the ratification of the 14th Amendment for its lack of gender-neutral language, arguing that the word male, appearing three times in the amendment, was a “gross outrage” to women citizens and taxpayers.

At the Women’s Rights Convention of 1852, Smith shared the speaker’s platform with Susan B. Anthony and Lucretia Mott. She delivered a powerful message for the suffrage movement, advocating for economic independence for women, for fair wages for their work, and for every woman to learn a trade. A nominee for president and vice-president on the Woman Suffrage tickets of the 1860s, Smith stirred the nation with her Woman and Her Needs, a pamphlet published as a series of articles in the New York Tribune. Women should be free to develop their talents to the fullest, she wrote, arguing that “women be accepted as citizens and emancipated from the restrictions that imposed false standards upon them.” She stressed the need for women’s economic independence, and considered the vote for women to be essential. Since women were taxed, they should have a say in the laws they were required to obey.

In 1859, Smith and her family moved to Patchogue, purchasing the Squire Woodhull property. Her husband was the well-known humorist Seba Smith, who wrote under the pen name Major Jack Downing. After the death of her husband in 1868, Smith lived for a time in Blue Point, where she wrote dime novels and her autobiography. She continued to lecture on women’s rights in New York in the 1870s. Elizabeth Oakes Smith is buried in the historic Roe Cemetery of Patchogue.

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: February 23, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Shipwreck off Fire Island

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian   

Fire Island’s Historic 1850 Shipwreck. (From the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Image Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.) 

Among the many shipwrecks along the south shore of Long Island was the July 19, 1850 wreck of the bark Elizabeth, a few miles east of the Fire Island Lighthouse at what would become Point O’ Woods. The Elizabeth was one of the most publicized shipwrecks to precede the founding of the United States Life-Saving Service. Sailing from Italy, the vessel was carrying a cargo of marble, silk, oils, and soaps, as well as five passengers and a crew of fourteen. Ten people lost their lives in the wreck.

Margaret Fuller was among those who perished in the Elizabeth wreck, along with her husband and child. An author, teacher, editor, critic, transcendentalist, advocate of women’s rights, and feminist, Fuller’s book Woman in the Nineteenth Century (1845), a major work in American feminism, brought recognition to women’s intellectual contributions at a time when women were not permitted to receive a college education. Her literary peers included Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, among others. Fuller’s death was publicized by her fellow literary colleagues, which served to increase pressure to reform life-saving measures along our nation’s shores.

Learn more about the life and death of Margaret Fuller and the shipwreck of the Elizabeth off Fire Island at our upcoming Women’s History Month Book & Bottle event, Margaret Fuller: America’s First Feminist, presented by Frank Turano, on Thursday, March 7, 2019 – 6:00 pm. Call to reserve: 631-727-2881 x100.

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: February 16, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

The Henry Perkins, Riverhead

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian   

 

Henry Perkins Hotel Letterhead, c. 1930. (From the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Image Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

The Henry Perkins Hotel opened in Riverhead on August 11, 1929. Still located at the corner of West Main Street and Osborn Avenue in downtown Riverhead (where it now serves as an adult home), the Henry Perkins Hotel was considered one of the finest hotels of its size and type in the country. August H. Galow designed the building in keeping with the planned architecture of the soon to be neighboring Suffolk County Historical Society, which he also designed. The kitchen was designed by Walter J. Buzzini, who had also designed the large kitchen at the Biltmore Hotel in NYC. Much of the finer class of millwork used in the construction of the hotel was supplied by E. Bailey & Sons, a lumber and supply company located in Patchogue.

The new Henry Perkins Hotel was equipped with seventy-seven spacious bedrooms, a cheerful fine-dining room, 3,200 plates, 2,200 pieces of silver flatware, and assorted modern conveniences, such as stock market tickers so guests could keep an eye on the market. Boasting an inviting and home-like atmosphere and traditional hospitality, as well as safe, “fireproof” construction, the hotel was named after J. Henry Perkins, a Riverhead native who had served as Deputy Sheriff and Treasurer for the county.

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: February 9, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

MANUMISSIONS

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian   

Manumissions, by Jonathan Jagger of Southampton, of Pegg and Her Child Tamer, 1797. (From the Grathwohl Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Image Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.

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Slavery was officially abolished in New York State in 1827, less than two hundred years ago. In 1698, some 1,100 slaves called “bondsman” resided on Long Island; 10 percent of the population of Southampton was enslaved at this time. In 1749, some 3,400 slaves resided on Long Island; and in 1775, on the eve of the American Revolution, there were 5,000 slaves.

Manumissions (the freeing of slaves) increased during and after the Revolution. In 1788, a manumission law was enacted that provided for freeing slaves but protected those who were elderly or ill from being freed without adequate provisions for their care. New York declared that all children born of slaves after July 4, 1799, were free, though the owners could retain the male child’s service until age twenty-eight and the female’s until age twenty-five. However, the slaveowner could also elect to abandon his claim to the child’s service and pass the responsibility for supporting the child to the state.

The manumission document shown here is transcribed as follows: “Know all men by these presents that I, Jonathan Jagger of Southampton, County of Suffolk, and state of New York do promise to let a Mullato servant woman called Pegg that I purchased of Capt. James Reeve be free at the end of five years from the date hereof and her child Tamer, which is now one year and six months old, at the age of thirty years provided they can secure said Jagger or his heirs and assigns from the maintenance of them. The said  Pegg and Tamer in witness whereof I have set my hand and seal this 9th of October 1797. — Jonathan Jagger, in the presence of John Youngs

A state law enacted in 1817 provided that by 1827 all slaves in New York would be considered free.

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: February 2, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Sarah J. Smith Garnet, Educator & Suffragist

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian  

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Celebrating Black History Month: SARAH J. SMITH GARNET (1831-1911).

Sarah J. Smith Garnet was an educator and an early suffragist who lived in Brooklyn and had Shinnecock and Montaukett ancestry. She was a pioneer as the first African American female school principal in the New York City school system, a post she held for thirty-seven years. She was also the older sister of Susan Smith McKinney Steward (1847-1918), the first African American woman in New York state to graduate with a medical doctorate (M.D.).

Garnet had two marriages. Her first husband, Samuel Tompkins, passed away in 1852, and her two children from that marriage also died prematurely. In 1879, at age 48, she married Henry Highland Garnet, a respected Presbyterian minister, a fighter for black voting rights, an opponent of slavery, and the first African American to address the U.S. Congress. Sarah was widowed again when her second husband died in 1882, two months into his post as United States Ambassador to Liberia.

In the late 1880s, Sarah Garnet organized the Equal Suffrage League, the first suffrage group formed in Brooklyn by an African American woman. The group advocated for voting rights for black women. After her retirement from the public school system, Garnet traveled to England to learn about the suffrage movement there. She worked on various national and local suffrage scenes, becoming the superintendent of the suffrage department of the National Association of Colored Women. As a member of the Equal Suffrage Club, Garnet supported the Niagara Movement, a predecessor to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). 

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: January 26, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

A Treatise on Contrition

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian  

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A Treatise of Contrition, by Thomas Hooker, 1632. (From the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

One of the oldest items in our library collection is this “The Soul’s Preparation for Christ: A Treatise of Contrition,” a holy book authored by the English minister Thomas Hooker and printed in London in 1632. Hooker (1586-1647) was a prominent Pilgrim colonial leader who founded the colony of Connecticut after dissenting with Pilgrim leaders in Massachusetts. He’s often referred to as the “Father of Connecticut” and was an important figure in the early development of colonial New England. 

Based on the dozens of names written on the endpapers of this book (Horton, Benjamin, Terry, Wells, Reeve, etc.), we can surmise that it originates from the earliest days in Southold. Indeed, it is quite possible the book was brought over from England by the earliest settlers of Southold. Its cover, made of hide, was likely added to the 1632 manuscript sometime in the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century. The cover contains the following handwritten inscription:

“This Holy Book belongs to R. L. Peters. He is daily reading it prepartory to taking the seat of Deacon in the 1st Church in Southold. Thomas S. Lester his writing, 1879.”

Inside the book, on page 6, is written: “This Book belongs to R. L. Peters. Don’t steal it for God may say in that great day, where is my Holy Book you stole away from my friend Peters.”

We were unable to verify, with assistance from the First Presbyterian Church in Southold, that R. L. Peters ever served as a deacon in the church. Our best guess is that the book belonged to Richard Landon Peters (1812-1889), a farmer and lifelong resident of Southold.

Please note that due to the age and fragility of this 387-year-old book, it can be neither handled nor opened, and it is not kept in our regular library archives. Viewing the book without handling is possible, but by appointment only. 

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: January 19, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Quogue vs. Quiogue

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian  

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To view Harry T. Tuthill Fullerton Collection photo please visit Suffolk County Historical Society website:Quogue Pines, 1900. (Image from the Harry T. Tuthill Fullerton Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Copyright © Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

Not to be confused with Quogue, the hamlet of Quiogue (pronounced Quī-og) is located between the villages of Quogue and Westhampton Beach, and is bounded to the south by Quantuck Bay. Three hundred and sixty-plus years ago, Native Americans named and inhabited the area now called Quiogue, meaning “Little Quogue.” The first written use of the name Quiogue in the Southampton Town records occurred in 1707. This entry relates to the passing of land from Joseph Foster to his son, Daniel Foster.

The Village of Quogue was founded in 1649. The name Quogue means “a shaking marsh, cove, or estuary,” and was derived from the Native American word Quaquanantuck. The early settlers of Southampton realized the value of the broad natural salt marsh meadows near Quogue for grazing their cattle, oxen, swine, and sheep. Also, unlike some neighboring villages, Quogue offered direct access to the beach for fishing and whaling. Quogue was also described as a place where one could simultaneously “breathe the scent of ancient pines and the air of the ocean.”  

Readings: Historical Profile of the Hamlet of Quiogue, by Ronald A. Michne Jr.; and Notes on Quogue, by Richard H. Post. 

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Call today to register: 631-727-2881 x100

Members Free; Non-Members $5. Incudes wine & cheese + admission to current exhibits!

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: January 12, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Flanders 

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian  

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A View of Methodist Point in Flanders, c. 1902. (From the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Image © copyright Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

About two miles from Riverhead is the hamlet bearing the name Flanders. How and when Flanders acquired its name remain a mystery, though it may be that the hamlet adopted the name based on its wetlands and other similarities with the Flanders region of present-day Belgium in Europe. The word “Flanders” is adopted from the Flemish “Vlaanderen,” which means “flooded land.”

It’s believed that the first settlement was made in Flanders about 1770, and the first English settlers included Josiah Goodale and Ellis Squires. Southampton Town records refer to Goodale’s house at “Aukabog” as early as 1761, and other references indicate that the structure was likely built prior to 1760. Josiah is credited with clearing much of the land in the hamlet area, and his descendants continue to reside there today. A Congregational church was built in Flanders about 1840, and a Methodist church was built about 1860.

Another early inhabitant of Flanders was James Fanning II, a Southold native and son of Captain James Fanning, who was a hero of the French Indian War and the first of the Fannings to settle on Long Island. The oldest known surviving house in the hamlet is that of James Benjamin. His homestead, built in circa 1782 and located on Flanders Road, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Suggested Reading: History of Suffolk County (Munsell, 1882).

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.

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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: January 5, 2019— FROM THE SCHS LIBRARY ARCHIVES

 

“How shall we know it is us without our past?”
– John Steinbeck 

Jefferson Echo Building, c. 1920

by Wendy Polhemus-Annibell, Head Librarian  

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Jefferson Echo Building, c. 1920. (From the Collection of the Suffolk County Historical Society Library Archives. Image © copyright Suffolk County Historical Society. All rights reserved.)

The Port Jefferson Echo was a local newspaper published weekly for nearly forty years, from 1892 until 1931. Established by Charles A. Squires, a native of Good Ground (Hampton Bays), the first issue was released on August 13, 1892, with the masthead noting the publication was “Devoted to the Welfare of Port Jefferson Village and Surrounding Communities.” It also names the location as “Echo, Long Island, N.Y.,” which a part of Port Jefferson village used to be called, and marks the annual subscription price at one dollar. Two years later, in 1894, the paper was endorsed as the official Republican paper by the Suffolk County Board of Supervisors.

The location of the building shown here was on Main Street near the railroad station. The Port Jefferson Echo occupied one-half of the building, and the Echo Post Office occupied the other half.

A. Jay Tefft purchased the Port Jefferson Echo in 1899, and remained its owner, editor, and publisher for many years. Mr. Tefft brought to the weekly his extensive experience as an editor of several NYC newspapers, helping to make the Echo “one of the best newspapers in the County” (according to historian Peter Ross). This week’s featured photograph from our library collection was among Mr. Teftt’s grandson’s personal effects.

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UPCOMING EVENTS & EXHIBIT OPENINGS

Gish Gallery: “Oh, Sweet Spring!” opens March 7.

Weathervane Gallery: When Women Wore Whales opens April 13.

KIDS WEEK: April 24 – 27, 2019.

 

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CURRENT EXHIBITS

The Long Island Express:  Remembering the 1938 Hurricane, in our Gish Gallery.

The Silver Screens of Suffolk: Celebrating the History of Film from the 1900s to the 1960s, in our Grand Staas Gallery.

Spotlight Series: A Moment of Tranquili–TEA, in our History in the Hall Display Cases.

Spotlight Series: The Paintings. Highlights from the Permanent Collection, in our Weathervane Gallery.

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BOOK & BOTTLE LECTURE SERIES

Wine & Cheese or light refreshments included. Members Free; Non-Members $5. RSVP to (631) 727-2881 x100. 

Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019. Jim Szakmary on A Veteran’s Reflections on the Vietnam War1:00 PM

Thursday, March 7, 2019. Frank Turano on Margaret Fuller: America’s First Feminist. 6:00 PM

 

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Visit: www.suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org
To View 2014 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2015 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2016 Photo of the Week pages click here. 
To View 2017 Photo of the Week pages click here.
To View 2018 Photo of the Week pages click here.
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